The Telegraph: A stark contrast between cricket’s sub-continental allure and its domestic apathy

On the opening morning of the men’s Cricket World Cup at The Oval, the queue extending from the adjacent underground station was encouraging. The bottleneck, however, was formed not by excited fans but by commuters, puzzled by the appearance of a large shiny trophy on a cardboard pedestal outside. Briefly obstructing their daily shuffle, it was an irritant, soon forgotten.

Continue reading The Telegraph: A stark contrast between cricket’s sub-continental allure and its domestic apathy

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The Telegraph: Kate Cross interview – ‘We are perfectionists because we have had to prove ourselves in a man’s world’

England’s women begin their international summer on Thursday in the shadow of a men’s World Cup, in which the hosts are seeking to emulate what their female counterparts did two summers ago.

Continue reading The Telegraph: Kate Cross interview – ‘We are perfectionists because we have had to prove ourselves in a man’s world’

The Telegraph: Eoin Morgan hails Jos Buttler – ‘He seems to have a gear that not many of us have’

How do you bowl to Jos Buttler? That was the question put to Mickey Arthur, Pakistan’s head coach, after his team found themselves on the wrong end of a Buttler onslaught. Buttler showed no mercy as he belted 110 runs from 55 balls, and still ended up unbeaten.

Continue reading The Telegraph: Eoin Morgan hails Jos Buttler – ‘He seems to have a gear that not many of us have’

BBC World Service: Stumped – Are West Indies back for good?

BBC World Service: Stumped – The Toughest Job in World Cricket?
BBC World Service
9 February 2019

West Indies are back – but for how long? Does the trouncing of England truly herald a second coming for the former giants of the game?

Plus former Australia opener Chris Rogers weighs up the strengths and weaknesses of England and Australia six months before the Ashes.

And the great Antarctic cricket bat mystery.

The Nightwatchman: Cricket for all colours

The Nightwatchman – The Wisden Cricket Quarterly

Issue 21 – Spring 2018

The Nightwatchman is a quarterly collection of essays and long-form articles and is available in print and e-book formats.

Isabelle Westbury asks whether the game is undergoing a cultural shift.

Nearly 30 years on British Asians have still not been fully accepted into English cricket. However, the next 18 months offer an excellent opportunity for change – a chance to build on the events of last year: Pakistan’s victory over India in the Champions Trophy and India’s bold run in the Women’s World Cup. With the India and Pakistan men’s teams touring the UK this summer, and a World Cup to follow in 2019, more subcontinental cricket is coming to these shores than ever before. What more can be done to ensure that cricket in this country really is a game for everyone who lives here – including the three million South Asians who make up almost five per cent of the population?

The Cricketer: Club scene – Clubbed together or miles apart?

Isabelle Westbury compares the English recreational game with its Australian counterpart, with the help of Daniel Bell-Drummond of Kent and The Grade Cricketer’s Sam Perry

During an Ashes series, every aspect of English and Australian life becomes a fevered competition, from how imaginative the crowd chants are, to who serves the best coffee*. As predictably as Nathan Lyon taking Moeen Ali’s wicket, every level of cricket in each country is scrutinised, often becoming the saviour of, or scapegoat for, a series win or loss. This time county cricket bore the brunt, its bloated 18-team set-up deemed inferior to the She eld Shield, which is played between just six states. inevitably club cricket, the next layer down, is also dissected – and compared. for many young english county players, grade cricket, the highest form of club cricket in each australian state, is a rite of passage. it is an opportunity to play bruising cricket in a warm climate at a standard often compared to some of the second division county teams.

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Wisden Cricket Monthly: County cricket – the answer to, not the reason for, England’s troubles?

The extent to which county cricket is clearly ignored by pundits and decision-makers is damning, says Isabelle Westbury.

Continue reading Wisden Cricket Monthly: County cricket – the answer to, not the reason for, England’s troubles?

Wisden Cricket Monthly: My Golden Summer – 2009

Tales & treasures from cricket’s glorious past

Isabelle Westbury
The cricket broadcaster and former Middlesex captain on a summer which marked a turning point in cricket’s balance of power, and the year she turned English

Continue reading Wisden Cricket Monthly: My Golden Summer – 2009